Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception

December 8th is the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception, a Holy Day of Obligation in the Catholic Church.

The Immaculate Conception is an often misunderstood concept.  Many think that it has to do with Jesus’ virgin birth.  In reality, it has to do with Mary’s being conceived from the first moment of her being free from original sin.  We are all born in a state of lacking sanctifying grace – in a certain estrangement from God.  Not so with Mary.  From the first moment of her existence, Satan had no dominion over her. 

Monday, November 10, 2014

Ongoing Adult Faith Formation at St. Joseph

“Meditation: It’s not just for Buddhists”

When we’re young, we “learn out prayers.”  But is there more to praying as an adult?  Would you like to deepen your prayer life this Advent? Catholicism has a long tradition of meditation and various methods to engage in this type of prayer.  Come find out more! 
Wednesday December 17th from 7:00-8:30 pm in the School Hall.  This event is free and open to everyone!
     

Monday, October 20, 2014

"An Introduction to the Early Church Fathers" - Audio and Notes

    Did you miss the October 15th Adult Education Session, "An Introduction to the Early Church Fathers?"  No worries!  The notes and audio are available below!
   
     

  •       Click HERE for the notes for the session
  •       Click HERE for the Timeline Chart mentioned in the session
  •       Click HERE for session audio (Link takes you to another page where you can download the mp3 audio file)

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Why "Host?"

Why do we call Holy Communion a “host?”  What does the word “host” mean here?


"Host” comes from the Latin word for “Victim” (hostia).  There’s even a Latin Hymn about the Eucharist called “O Salutaris Hostia” which means “O Saving Victim.”  Why would we use the word “victim” to describe Holy Communion?  Because the Mass is a sacrifice.


Wednesday, July 23, 2014

The Pelican


Have you noticed this stained glass window in the Church? It's the image of a pelican feeding its young with its own blood.  
Fr. William Saunders writes about the Christian symbolism of the pelican HERE

The image is rooted in a pre-Christian legend.
The legend was that in time of famine, the mother pelican wounded herself, striking her breast with the beak to feed her young with her blood to prevent starvation. Another version of the legend was that the mother fed her dying young with her blood to revive them from death, but in turn lost her own life.